How to Freeze Dry Eggs

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Learn how to freeze dry eggs so you can stock your pantry with long-lasting ingredients. Perfect for suburban homesteads or small storage spaces.

I live on 1/8 of an acre in a typical suburban neighborhood. And truth be told, not only does the HOA prohibit me from having chickens, I don’t want chickens.

In the fairytales of my mind, having chickens seems like a great idea. But the reality is I don’t really have the time, energy, or desire to take care of flock of tiny dinosaurs (aka chickens).

However, I do prefer to cook and bake with farm fresh eggs. I purchase eggs from my “egg dealer” (aka Micala). She drops them off on my porch, and I Venmo her $5/dozen. It’s a win-win for both of us.

When winter comes though, her chickens lay fewer eggs. And of course, I don’t have my own chickens. So to ensure that I can have farm fresh eggs all year without having to raise my own chickens, I rely on my Harvest Right freeze dryer.

What are freeze dried eggs?

Unlike a food dehydrator that cooks the food, a freeze dryer removes the water from the food without cooking it or changing the nutritional composition. If you want to learn more about the science behind freeze drying, check out this article.

Freeze dried eggs are, essentially, dried eggs that, once reconstituted with water, return to their original, raw state. It’s kind of magical.

Watch How to Freeze Dry Eggs

YouTube video

Tips

  • Use farm-fresh or store-bought eggs. I prefer to freeze dry farm-fresh eggs so that I can have them all year long. Any time my “egg dealer” has a few dozen eggs, I buy them and freeze dry them. However, if you find a great deal on organic eggs at the store, buy them! You can freeze dry any egg.
  • Plan ahead for short- or long-term storage. For me, pantry space is an issue. I don’t have a cellar or a homestead pantry. So I have to determine how much preserved food I can actually keep. Decide if you want to keep your eggs for short- or long-term storage. For short-term, determine how many jars of freeze dried eggs can fit in your pantry. If you want long-term storage, decide how much you can store and where.
  • Pre-freeze if possible. Pre-freezing your egg mixture isn’t necessary. But it will speed up the process once they are in the freeze dryer (and you can save a few bucks on electricity this way). Honestly though, I don’t often have the freezer space to do this, and my eggs turn out great every time. They just take a little longer in the freeze dryer.

Benefits for “suburban homesteads”

  • They take up almost no space. Freeze-dried eggs are perfect for suburban homesteads or homes with limited storage space because they take up very little room. I am able to preserve 3 dozen eggs in a quart jar in my pantry. Not only would those eggs have gone bad in the fridge, they would take up a lot more space.
  • Perfect if you can’t have or don’t want chickens. Not every home or personality is suited for raising a flock of hens. HOA restrictions, busy schedules, or just plain old lack of desire are a few valid reasons for not having chickens. Freeze drying eggs offers the benefits of year-round farm fresh eggs without having to deal with raising chickens.
  • They are convenient. Freezing drying eggs requires almost no hands-on time. Once they are done, you have fresh eggs at your fingertips. That’s much easier than running to the store or even go out to a chicken coop to collect eggs. They are clean, available, and ready to use at a moment’s notice.

FAQs

How long do freeze dried eggs last?

As long as your eggs are completely dry and stored properly, they can last up to 20 years! They are great if you are looking for long-term storage. I am not really interested in long-term storage for my personal uses. So I freeze dry them and use them as needed. I try to keep enough on hand to get me through winter.

Are freeze dried raw eggs safe?

Yes! Of course, they cannot be eaten raw. Because even though they are dried, they are still raw eggs. But once reconstituted with water, they can be cooked and eaten like any other egg. I like to label my jar with “raw” just so I remember not to eat the eggs without cooking them first.

Can you make scrambled eggs with freeze dried eggs?

Yup! Prior to freezing, you will have to whisk or blend the eggs. As such, they are already pre-scrambled for you. To cook with them, you just add water and cook like normal. They do have a slightly different taste than fresh scrambled eggs because the whites and yolks are completely mixed together. Personally, I like to use them for omelets and baking over scrambled eggs. But they do work totally fine for scrambled eggs.

How do you store freeze dried eggs?

Freeze dried eggs, if properly processed and stored, can last up to 20 years. For long-term storage, it is generally recommended to store them in mylar bags with oxygen absorbers.

I’m not looking to store eggs that long, so I store them in a mason jar and vacuum seal the lid with a handheld sealer. Each time I open the jar, I re-seal vacuum seal it. I keep my eggs this way for a few months at a time, and they can last about year this way.

When packing your freeze dried eggs for short- or long-term storage, don’t dilly dally. The longer they sit out in the open, the more water they will absorb from the air. This happens faster than you’d imagine, so be prepared to get them in jars or bags quickly.

I get my jars, lids, bag, etc. prepared and ready to go before I take the eggs out of the freeze dryer. That way, I can reduce the amount of time they are exposed to the air.

How do you reconstitute freeze dried eggs?

It’s as easy as just adding water. For one egg, mix together 2 tablespoons of freeze dried eggs and 2 tablespoons of water. Sometimes, I need to add a little more water to get the right consistency. But a 1:1 ratio is a good starting point.

Can you bake with freeze dried eggs?

Yes! In fact, baking is my favorite way to use freeze dried eggs. I use them for enriched breads and doughs like sourdough cinnamon rolls, chocolate babka, and more.

How to Powder Eggs

With a blender

Place the dried eggs in a completely dry blender. The eggs will absorb any moisture. If this happens, they will go bad. So just make sure even underneath your blade is dry. Blend until they turn into a powder.

With your hands (and a rolling pin)

You can most definitely powder eggs with your hands and a rolling pin. Working in small batches, put the dried eggs into a freezer bag. Crumble them with your hand and give them a little whack with a rolling pin (this is very therapeutic, btw).

Tools You Will Need

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Ingredients

  • Eggs (up to 8 dozen for a medium Harvest Right Home Pro freeze dryer)

How to Freeze Dry Eggs

Turn on your freeze dryer, and follow the prompts. It will tell you to chill the vacuum chamber for 15 minutes before loading trays of food. Be sure to close the valve (it should be perpendicular to the drain line).

If you just collected your eggs, wash them thoroughly. This shouldn’t be an issue for store-bought eggs.

Crack the eggs either into a blender or a large bowl. For a blender, pulse until they are smooth. If you are whisking them, whisk in small batches so you can be sure to thoroughly incorporate the yolks.

Using a container with a pour spout, fill the freeze dryer trays until they are full. I find it easiest to keep the tray in the machine, pull it out just a little, and fill it. This way, I don’t have to worry about carrying and spilling trays full of liquid.

Close and seal the freeze dryer door. Hit start.

Let the freezer dryer do its thing. How long the process will take depends on the number of eggs and the temperature of the room (if your freeze dryer is in a garage like mine, for example, it can take longer on hot days). It usually takes somewhere around 18-36 hours.

Once the freeze dryer has completed the process, check the eggs to make sure they are completely dry. If there is any moisture at all, return all of the trays into the machine, and select “more dry time.”

When the eggs are completely dry, store them in a glass jar with an air-tight lid (short-term storage) or in mylar bags with an appropriately sized oxygen absorber (long-term storage up to 20+ years).

Note: When packing your freeze dried eggs, don’t dilly dally. The longer they sit out in the open, the more water they will absorb from the air. This happens faster than you’d imagine, so be prepared to get them in jars or bags quickly.

Where to purchase a freeze dryer

Most home food preservationists use a Harvest Right freezer dryer. You can buy one directly from Harvest Right or use my Harvest Right affiliate link.

If you choose to use my affiliate link, I will receive a commission at no expense to you. It’s a great way to help me provide more free content for you. Thank you for supporting my content!

Three quart jars of freeze dried eggs

How to Freeze Dry Eggs

Yield: About 7-8 dozen eggs (for a medium freezer dryer)
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Active Time: 5 minutes
Additional Time: 1 day
Total Time: 1 day 20 minutes
Difficulty: Beginner

Learn how to freeze dry eggs so you can stock your pantry with long-lasting ingredients. If you don't have chickens or have a small pantry, this is especially helpful because you can freeze dry farm fresh eggs when you can get them, and they take up almost no space in the pantry.

Materials

  • Eggs

Tools

  • Harvest Right Freeze Dryer
  • Mylar bags (for long-term storage)
  • Oxygen absorbers (for long-term storage)
  • Jars (for short-term storage)
  • Handheld vacuum sealer (for short-term storage)

Instructions

  1. Turn on your freeze dryer, and follow the prompts. It will tell you to chill the vacuum chamber for 15 minutes before loading trays of food. Be sure to close the valve (it should be perpendicular to the drain line).
  2. If your eggs are freshly collected, wash them thoroughly. This shouldn't be an issue for store-bought eggs.
  3. Crack the eggs either into a blender or a large bowl. For a blender, pulse until they are smooth. If you are whisking them, whisk in small batches so you can be sure to thoroughly incorporate the yolks.
  4. Using a container with a pour spout, fill the freeze dryer trays until they are full. I find it easiest to keep the tray in the machine, pull it out just a little, and fill it. This way, I don't have to worry about carrying and spilling trays full of liquid.
  5. Close and seal the freeze dryer door. Hit start.
  6. Let the freeze dryer do its thing. How long the process will take depends on the number of eggs and the temperature of the room (if your freeze dryer is in a garage like mine, for example, it can take longer on hot days). But it usually takes somewhere around 18-36 hours.
  7. Once the freeze dryer has completed the process, check the eggs to make sure they are completely dry. If there is any moisture at all, return all of the trays into the machine, and select "more dry time."
  8. When the eggs are completely dry, store them in a glass jar with an air-tight lid (short-term storage) or in mylar bags with an appropriately sized oxygen absorber (long-term storage up to 20+ years).

Notes

Many find it helpful to pre-freeze the eggs on the trays before freeze drying. This is a totally viable option, but one I have skipped. Often, I don't have the freezer space to pre-freeze. Either way, it will work totally fine. If you pre-freeze them, they will need to be COMPLETELY frozen before putting them in your freeze dryer.

Note: When packing your freeze dried eggs, don't dilly dally. The longer they sit out in the open, the more water they will absorb from the air. This happens faster than you'd imagine, so be prepared to get them in jars or bags quickly.

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