No-Knead Sourdough Bread for Beginners

Sharing is caring!

A no-knead sourdough bread for beginners and advanced bakers alike! This crusty artisan sourdough is prepped one day and baked the next, which gives is a deep and delicious sourdough taste.

Baking homemade sourdough bread is a science and an art. Over the years, I’ve had long seasons of baking bread and short seasons without baking. No matter what though, I always find myself back in the kitchen baking sourdough.

On the surface, it’s a fun and rewarding hobby with the added payoff that it feeds my family. Deeper than that though, baking sourdough offers simplicity and familiarity in an increasingly complicated and changing world.

I know that sounds dramatic. But truly, it is a wholesome, simple practice that allows me to momentarily step out of the daily chaos.

As such, over the last year, baking sourdough has been something I’ve craved doing. While we were on vacation last month, I had to laugh at myself because I couldn’t wait to get home and bake sourdough. I missed the routine and the structure that baking sourdough offers.

Above all else though, the greatest joy of baking sourdough is sharing it with my family. Recently, when I pulled a sourdough boule out of the oven, my two-year-old said, “I want to eat that bread.” It’s one of the few things she consistently eats and enjoys. And I love that she enjoys it that much.

Is baking no-knead sourdough bread hard?

I truly believe anyone can make delicious sourdough bread! And this no-knead sourdough bread for beginners is no exception. In fact, it’s the perfect starting point for new sourdough bakers.

You’ll will need a sourdough starter to bake homemade sourdough bread. If you haven’t learned how yet, my simple sourdough starter video is a great starting point.

Rebecca pouring sourdough starter into a small bowl

I often hear people express that they are nervous about baking sourdough because it seems so technical. In some ways, it is. But more often than not, I’ve found that sourdough is relatively forgiving. So don’t let the science and the technical components–and definitely the chatter on the internet–deter you.

You can 100% bake sourdough bread. I’m sure of it.

And hey, if your bread doesn’t turn out sometimes (because that does happen from time to time), you can still use it for toast, croutons, and bread crumbs. It’s a win no matter the result. Remember, this is a no-knead sourdough bread for beginners, so give yourself the chance to practice a few times!

Sourdough bread with iris flower stenciled on it

What is sourdough bread?

You probably know what homemade or even store-brought sourdough bread tastes like, but what exactly is it? Sourdough is bread made from fermented grains and wild yeast.

I am not a nutritionist or health professional, so I don’t want to get too into depth about the nutritional qualities of sourdough. But it sourdough is general considered a healthy option because of its long fermentation process.

It is also widely suggested that gluten-intolerant (not celiac) people can tolerate soudough. However, if that applies to you, I suggest talking with your healthcare provider to see if sourdough is a good choice for you.

Bake with me! // Watch how to make no-knead sourdough bread for beginners

YouTube video

Scoring Sourdough Bread

The internet is chock full of beautiful images of artfully scored sourdough bread. And though I often like to strive for aesthetics in the kitchen (strive is the operative word, not achieve), in reality, no matter what my bread looks like, it tastes delicious.

You can even see in the picture below that my sourdough isn’t scored perfectly. Still, it is a scratch-made-with-love loaf of sourdough that my family can enjoy–and that is a beautiful thing.

If you feel intimidated by sourdough bread scoring or if this is your first time making this no-knead sourdough bread for beginners recipe, my bread art stencils are a great option! Using a bread art stencil is simple. All you will have to do is stencil, give a simple score, and bake.

So if you are new to baking sourdough bread, don’t get hung up on scoring. Just focus on baking for now, and use a sourdough art stencil to simplify the process.

Can you skip scoring?

No. I know I just said don’t worry about artful scoring. But you will need to score your bread even if it is just a single slice or “X” on the top.

Scoring gives you control over where and how the bread expands during baking. All dough has a weak spot that will crack as the bread expands in the oven (known as “oven spring”). As such, if you were to forgo scoring, your bread will chaotically expand and crack in random places.

By scoring your sourdough, you are creating an intentional weak point that will control which way your bread expands. And as an added bonus, it looks pretty.

Two Types of Scoring

Expansion scoring: This is the deep slash you often see on homemade sourdough bread. Generally, is type of scoring is 1/2 inch deep and be long enough for your bread to full rise.

Artistic scoring: This is the beautiful art I find myself admiring on sourdough. The purpose of artistic scouring is to add decorative appeal. These scores are usually around 1/4 inch deep.

My baking schedule

In general, when baking homemade sourdough bread, I prefer to prep my starter the night before. It does, however, depend on how active my starter is. If I’ve recently fed my starter whole wheat flour, I only have about 4-6 hours before my starter has doubled. So feeding the night before doesn’t work because it has already doubled and deflated by the time I wake up. If my starter is only digesting all-purpose flour, I usually have 10-12 hours before it’s ready.

This schedule is assuming my starter needs 10-12 hours to get bubble and active.

The night before

  • 10:00 pm: Remove starter from refrigerator. Discard half and feed 1:1 flour/water. Leave out on the counter.

The next morning

  • 10:00 am: Combine flour and water, mix until combined. Wait 60 minutes (this is called autolyse. It allows the wheat to soften and enzymes to release)
  • 10:30 am: Add starter and salt to the flour/water mixture. Mix with clean hand for 3-5 minutes. Allow to rest for 30 minutes.
  • 11:00am: Begin stretch and fold
    • First set: 3 times every 15 minutes
    • Second set: 3 times every 30 minutes
    • This is a total of 6 stretch and fold cycles over the course of 2.25 hours.
  • 1:30pm (ish): After last stretch and fold, cover dough with a damp towel and allow to bulk ferment for 5-6 hours.
  • 7:30pm (ish): Remove dough from bowl, divide into two pieces using a dough scraper. Shape dough and allow to rest for 20 minutes.
  • 7:50pm: Place dough face-down in banneton basket or towel-lined bowl. Cover with plastic and refrigerate for 12-15 hours.

The next day

  • 10:00am: Preheat cast iron dutch oven for 30 minutes.
  • 10:30am: Take dough out of refrigerator, turn out onto parchment paper, and score. Place bread in dutch oven with lid on. Bake for 25 minutes.
  • 10:55am: Remove dutch oven, take off the lid, and drop the temperature to 475. Bake without lid for 10-20 minutes or until done.
Sourdough bread with three hearts stenciled on it. Shown with bread art stencil

My Favorite Ways to Eat Homemade Sourdough Bread

There’s no wrong way to eat bread–other than not eating bread, haha! But there are a few ways I really love to eat homemade sourdough:

  • Toast for days! I don’t own or use a regular toaster. Instead, I melt butter in a cast iron pan and toast the homemade sourdough bread on the stovetop. It’s sooooo crispy and delicious this way.
  • Lightly toasted sourdough makes delicious garlic bread. I like to add garlic chives from my garden, butter, and a touch of salt.
  • Sourdough is a vessel for other deliciousness! I enjoy cutting my sourdough into cracker-sized pieces and eating other goodness on them. Chicken salad, hummus, cheese, you name it! It’s all better on bread.
  • Au naturale! Sometimes, a plain old piece of warm bread hits the spot. Remember, it doesn’t have to be fancy to be delicious and satisfying. 
  • Did someone say sandwiches?!?! Yes, please!

This post contains affiliate links. Any purchases from links outside of moon + magnolia may earn a commission at no additional cost to you. As part of the Amazon Associates program, links to Amazon will earn a commission with no extra cost. Thank you for supporting my content!

Tools You Will Need

Ingredients

  • 750 g All Purpose Flour
  • 200 g Whole Wheat Flour
  • 200 g Active, Bubbly Starter
  • 650 g Water
  • 20 g Coarse Kosher Salt
Rebecca demonstrating stretch and fold with sourdough bread dough

Instructions for Making Homemade Sourdough Bread

Prepare the dough

  1. Combine all purpose flour, whole wheat flour, and water. Gently mix until combined. Allow to sit for 30-45 minutes.
  2. Add sourdough starter and very gently mix/dimple into flour mixture. Using a wet hand can make this somewhat less messy. 🙂
  3. Add salt and mix for five minutes by hand. Remember, you aren’t kneading here. Instead, you are just gently combining the ingredients.
  4. Cover with a damp towel and let rest for 30 minutes.

Stretch and fold

  1. Begin the stretch and fold process. Stretch and fold the dough 5-8 times every 15 minutes. Do this for three cycles (so over the course of 45 minutes, repeat 5-8 stretch and folds three times). Cover with damp towel between cycles.
  2. Increase the stretch and fold cycles to every 30 minutes (over the course of 1.5 hours, repeat 5-8 stretch and folds three times). Cover with damp towel between cycles
  3. After all stretch and fold cycles are complete, cover with a damp towel and allow to rest on the counter for 5-6 hours or until doubled. I’ve found that any space below 73 degrees slows down the process. So find a spot that is warm.
  4. Once the dough has doubled, gently remove from the bowl onto a clean counter.
  5. Split the dough in half using a scraper or sharp knife.
  6. Shape each half into a ball by turning and spinning it toward yourself. The friction on the dry counter will create tension and aid in shaping.
  7. Allow to rest for 15-20 minutes.
  8. Place each ball into a banneton basket or tea towel-lined bowl FACE DOWN.
  9. Gently pinch the left and right sides together. Then, pinch the top and bottom together. This creates tension and a nice seam.
  10. Cover with plastic (I like to use a plastic shopping bag), and stick in the fridge for 12-15 hours.

The next day

  1. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees with a cast iron dutch oven (or two) inside. Allow the dutch oven to warm with the oven and stay in for about 20 minutes to get scorching hot.
  2. Once the dutch oven(s) is ready, remove the dough from the fridge and gently turn out onto a piece of parchment paper. Since they were placed in the basket/bowl face down, they should be right-side up when you turn them out.
  3. Rub the top of the dough with flour and scoring using a razor blade or lame.
  4. Keeping the dough on the parchment paper, place inside the hot dutch oven.
  5. With the dutch oven lid on, bake for 500 degrees for 25 minutes.
  6. Take the lid off, drop the temp to 475 and bake for approximately 15 minutes or until golden. Ovens vary, and mine only takes about 12 minutes at this point. So keep an eye on it. *Bread is generally considered “done” at 190 degrees internal temp.
  7. When done, remove from dutch oven and let cool to room temp on a wire rack.

More Sourdough Recipes

Sourdough bread with hearts stenciled on top

No-Knead Sourdough Bread

Yield: 2 boules
Prep Time: 45 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Additional Time: 12 hours
Total Time: 13 hours 30 minutes

A no-knead sourdough bread for beginners and advanced bakers alike! This crusty artisan sourdough is prepped one day and baked the next, which gives is a deep and delicious sourdough taste.

Ingredients

  • 750 g All Purpose Flour
  • 200 g Whole Wheat Flour
  • 200 g Active Bubbly Starter
  • 650 g Water
  • 20 g Coarse Kosher Salt

Instructions

    PREPARE THE DOUGH

  1. Combine all purpose flour, whole wheat flour, and water. Gently mix until combined. Allow to sit for 30-45 minutes.
  2. Add sourdough starter and very gently mix/dimple into flour mixture. Using a wet hand can make this somewhat less messy.
  3. Add salt and mix for five minutes by hand. Remember, you aren’t kneading here. Instead, you are just gently combining the ingredients
  4. Cover with a damp towel and let rest for 30 minutes.
  5. STRETCH AND FOLD

  1. Begin the stretch and fold process. Stretch and fold the dough 5-8 times (until you notice resistance from the dough). Do this for three cycles in 15-minute intervals. Cover with damp towel between cycles.
  2. Increase the stretch and fold cycles to every 30 minutes. Complete three cycles of stretch and folds. Cover with damp towel between cycles
  3. After all stretch and fold cycles are complete, cover with a damp towel and allow to rest on the counter for 5-6 hours or until doubled. I’ve found that any space below 73 degrees slows down the process. So find a spot that is warm or use a proofing box.
  4. Once the dough has doubled, gently remove from the bowl onto a clean counter.
  5. Split the dough in half using a scraper or sharp knife.
  6. Shape each half into a ball by turning and spinning it toward yourself. The friction on the dry counter will create tension and aid in shaping.
  7. Allow to rest for 15-20 minutes.
  8. Place each ball into a banneton basket or tea towel-lined bowl FACE DOWN.
  9. Gently pinch the left and right sides together. Then, pinch the top and bottom together. This creates tension and a nice seam.
  10. Cover with plastic (I like to use a plastic shopping bag), and stick in the fridge for 12-15 hours.

THE NEXT DAY

  1. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees with a cast iron dutch oven (or two) inside. Allow the dutch oven to warm with the oven and stay in for about 20 minutes to get scorching hot.
  2. Once the dutch oven(s) is ready, remove the dough from the fridge and gently turn out onto a piece of parchment paper. Since they were placed in the basket/bowl face down, they should be right-side up when you turn them out.
  3. Rub the top of the dough with flour and scoring using a razor blade or lame.
  4. Keeping the dough on the parchment paper, place inside the hot dutch oven.
  5. With the dutch oven lid on, bake for 500 degrees for 25 minutes.
  6. Take the lid off, drop the temp to 475 and bake for approximately 15 minutes or until golden. Ovens vary, and mine only takes about 12 minutes at this point. So keep an eye on it. *Bread is generally considered “done” at 190 degrees internal temp.
  7. When done, remove from dutch oven and let cool to room temp on a wire rack.
YouTube video

Recommended Products

As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 16 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 213Total Fat: 1gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 487mgCarbohydrates: 45gFiber: 3gSugar: 0gProtein: 6g

Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Instagram

6 Comments

  1. Pingback: Sourdough Discard Cinnamon Rolls -
  2. Pingback: How to Use a Bread Stencil - Easy Sourdough Art -
  3. Pingback: Double Chocolate Sourdough Babka -
  4. Pingback: Tips for Cast Iron Care
  5. Pingback: Superfood Veggie Soup - moon + magnolia
  6. Pingback: How to Use a Bread Stencil - Easy Sourdough Art - moon + magnolia

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *